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Caring for Your Cut Flower Arrangements

Posted by Chris Eudaley on


WATER FOR CUT FLOWERS Water quality affects flower life. Both hard water (containing many dissolved materials) or hard water that has been “softened” with a home water-softener are unsatisfactory for keeping flowers fresh. Hard waters are often alkaline (pH 7 to 10) rather than acid (pH 4 to 6). The only satisfactory means of improving hard or softened waters is to distill or deionize them, or you can buy water that has been so treated. Rainwater that is relatively clean is also useful. Floral preservatives contain some acidifying material that helps make water more acid and desirable. However, hard alkaline waters may require twice the amount of preservative as distilled, acid or naturally soft water. PROLONGING THE LIFE OF CUT...

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Cactus and Succulent Care

Posted by Chris Eudaley on


OK, so you just returned from the store with your first cactus plant, or perhaps you bought one of those funny looking little plants with a tag sticking in the pot that says "Assorted Succulents." You might be asking yourself, "how do I take care of this thing?" The first thing to realize is that the words "cacti" and "succulent" are general terms. Cacti belong to a specific family of plants, but the species within that family come from some very different habitats. Many cacti, such as those in the genus Ferocactus, are in fact true desert dwellers. Others, such as those in the genus Echinopsis, live in the grasslands of South America, those in the genus Oreocereus live in...

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Orchid Care Guide

Posted by Chris Eudaley on


Orchids, like all plants, need a balance of light, air, water and food to grow and flower well. Let's examine each of these elements.   Light Without enough light, orchids may produce lush looking growths but no flowers. Not giving orchids enough light is the most common reason for failure to bloom. The old notion of orchids growing in dark jungles still persists and it couldn't be further from the truth. In reality, many have evolved as epiphytes to take advantage of brighter light available in the upper forest canopy. How much light is enough? The answer to this seemingly simple question is "as much as they will take without burning." This means that the foliage should not be a...

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